NSScotland: The Speakers.

Mike Abdullah

HTTP and URLs for Cocoa Developers

Find yourself working with URLs and HTTP connections? You're a Cocoa developer, of course you do!

Sadly it's all too easy for us to muddle our way through the handling of these important standards, until one day a nasty edge case trips our code up. I know, I've been there myself.

This session will guide you through the basics, looking at what's really going on, and finishing up with how this all maps onto the Cocoa APIs.

Mike Abdullah

Karelia

Mike Abdullah "found" Karelia while studying for a Master's degree in Integrated Engineering. Hired on originally to write documentation for Sandvox 1.2, Mike joined Karelia full-time shortly after graduation. Completely unbeknownst to Dan or Terrence at the time, Mike was and is a spectacular Cocoa developer.

Quickly moving up through the ranks, Mike is now technical lead for Sandvox and manages Karelia's open source repositories on GitHub.

When not coding, Mike can often be found rock climbing or karting. He is also an accomplished musician, playing both trumpet and percussion for notable garage bands and orchestras around London.

Mike holds a Master's in Integrated Engineering with honors from the University of Reading.

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Steven Baker

Shifting Paradigms: Exploring Programming Languages and Their Features

Many developers have a favourite language, set of tools, or writing style that they prefer. Often, these preferences are influenced by the language they've used most often, or the one they learned first; sometimes these preferences influence those choices.

In this talk, you'll explore several programming paradigms such as Procedural, Object-Oriented and Functional as well as some more interesting and esoteric options. You'll learn about how different programming languages implement each paradigm, how they influence the way problems are solved, and what kinds of problems they are well suited to solving.

At the end of the talk, you'll have a better understanding of the different programming paradigms, and why their advocates love them so much. You'll gain an insight into different ways to solve problems, and how they can be better solved by shifting your paradigm.

Steven Baker

stevenrbaker.com

In the third grade, Steven missed an opportunity to corner the Hockey Trivia video game market when he made such a huge mess of his software he had to rewrite it. As with most rewrites, it was a huge failure, and Steven still hasn't forgiven himself. Since then, he has been obsessed with learning how to produce high quality software, and has been helping teams do just that. Along the way he's developed tools, delivered talks, and yelled over pints about how to improve software.

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Samuel Goodwin

Teaching Programming

The number of inexperienced developers is growing. If more of us dont start teaching these folks, we're going to have trouble. Every one of us can help. Come and learn how!

Samuel Goodwin

Roundwall Software

Samuel is an independent developer operating in Amsterdam. His latest app, Chainguard) helps people keep up with items they need for personal projects. He is a cyclist, a musician, and a teacher as well.

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Eric Knapp

Helping Blind Musicians with an iOS app using Core MIDI and Swift

Eric will share his experience of finding a need in the blind community and trying to help. It has been an adventure of learning and communication in areas where there is a serious lack of documentation. The talk will focus on some of the difficult parts of this journey into uncharted territories. Some of these include Core MIDI in Swift, SoundFonts in iOS, and designing a gesture-based UX for blind musicians. It will also touch on working with blind developers and musicians in a visual world.

Eric Knapp

Madison Area Technical College

Eric is a faculty member at Madison College in Madison, Wisconsin, USA. He teaches iOS development with a little Java on the side. Before venturing into the world of programming, he had careers as a high school teacher and a cabinetmaker. Eric has learned and forgotten a lot of programming langages in his long career. He has fond memories of most of them, including COBOL, which paid for his first Mac in 1986. The journey from COBOL to Swift has been welcome and rewarding.

Previously a professional musician, he is now an avid amateur playing the Chapman Stick. Audio and MIDI programming for iOS brought many of his lifelong interests together into one small package.

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Graham Lee

Testing an iOS app from one end to the other

As we seek to reliably release our apps frequently, regularly and at high quality, we need to be constantly aware of the state of our products and to be informed quickly of any problems. In this talk, Graham describes how end-to-end tests fit into Facebook's iOS app engineering, the problems they uncover and the challenges they solve - and introduce.

Graham Lee

Secure Mac programming

Graham is a mobile app developer and security boffin for at Facebook in London. He is the author of Test-Driven iOS Development, Professional Cocoa Application Security and APPropriate Behaviour.

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Drew McCormack

Technically Magic

App development and magic have a lot in common, and I'm not referring to the your-interface-should-feel-like-magic-and-delight-the-user kinda way. App development and magic both rely on technologies the audience is unaware of to achieve seemingly impossible feats. Displaying a steady stream of photos from a collection a hundred thousand strong on an underpowered iPod touch is arguably as impressive as the proverbial rabbit from the hat. In this talk, Drew will look at some of his favourite tricks. How do you make devices seem capable of greater performance than should be possible? How do you make them respond to events they should not be aware of? This talk will break the Magicians...er...developers code.

Drew McCormack

The Mental Faculty

After 15 years as a Theoretical Chemist, I developed an interest in Mac and iOS app development, and I'm now judge, jury, and executioner at The Mental Faculty B.V. Most of my working hours are spent dodging accountants and lawyers, and developing our flagship product, Mental Case. I've written articles for the Apple Developer Connection, and co-authored the book 'Beginning Mac OS X Snow Leopard Programming'. Teaching app development courses at CMM in Amsterdam keeps my knowledge fresh, and I've had involvements with MacResearch.org (board member/contributor) and the Core Plot project (founder/contributor). The past year of my life has been made a hell by iCloud.

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Helen McManus

Xcode VI: The Undocumented Country

Join us on our mission to explore strange parts of Xcode, to seek out new functionality and to split infinitives where no man - where no-one - has documented before.

Helen McManus

Invisible Pixels

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Rob Rix

Many Types Make Light Work

Every programmer regularly faces the challenges of managing complexity and change. Subclassing can help us simplify, by sharing code and interfaces between related parts of our program. But when requirements change out from under our class hierarchy, unanticipated fragility can mean bugs, sweat and tears. Swift offers us a better way.

Rob Rix

GitHub

Rob writes code (compulsively) and prose (cathartically) and terrible ideas (naturally) but above all, he is a machine for turning the last echoes of a long-dead sun into text.

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Sally Shepard

Hacking on the Apple TV

What can you do with your apple TV out of the box? How can you use it from your iOS applications? And what might we do with a jailbroken AppleTV? What might a hypothetical SDK look like?

Sally Shepard

Dennis Publishing

Sally initially decided to study audio out of a love of music and tinkering with expensive hardware. Not satisfied with one degree in audio engineering, she embarked on a second, where she continued her weird obsession with microphones. She started working at the Apple Store the week the first iPhone launched, and immediately knew it was time to switch tracks and get a third degree. After completing a Masters in Software Engineering, she started working as an iOS developer at a digital agency, producing bespoke apps for well-known clients.

She currently works in London, where she is Head of App Development at Dennis Publishing, one of the world’s leading independent publishers. In her spare time she enjoys hacking, playing banjo and taking pictures with vintage cameras.

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James Thomson

How to be Indie and Still Keep Your Sanity

James has been writing his own apps for over twenty years, and will share his great wisdom on how he's managed to be a successful indie developer without losing his mind. Actually, scratch that last part - in truth, he lost it years ago, and this is nothing more than a cautionary tale on where it all went wrong. Learn from his mistakes, learn well.

James Thomson

pcalc.com

James is a veteran of the Mac and iOS developer scene - he started working on his first app over twenty years ago and it's still running today. Following a brief tour of duty at Apple where he worked on the Mac OS X Finder and Dock, he has been working full time as an indie developer based in Glasgow, Scotland. He's currently best known for his calculator app PCalc, and application dock DragThing.

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Emily Toop

Computing's Hidden Heroes

Women have made significant contributions to computing since the very beginning, and yet most people have only heard of Ada Lovelace, Grace Hopper and, more recently, Hedy Lamar. In this talk I will be telling the stories of a several significant women from around the world who exist outside of the limelight, their struggles, their contributions and how modern technology would not be the same without them.

Emily Toop

emilytoop.com

Emily has been working with iOS and Android for the past 4 years, after moving into the domain from VOIP telecoms. After starting as a freelancer, a number of attempts at her own (and others) startups she now one of the founders of Balloon Digital Studios, a digital product development house. In her spare time she has been known to start a HackerSpace and build a few robots.

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Johnnie Walker

A Brief History of Image Processing on iOS

What are pixels, and what can we do with them once we've got some? From manipulating bitmaps to OpenGL & CoreImage kernels, a roughly chronological walk through of how iOS image effects are made.

Johnnie Walker

Random Sequence

Johnnie is an iOS and occasionally Mac developer living in rural Scotland. He's been building Mac apps since the early days of OS X, and iOS apps since day one. Now working on Camera+, the ultimate photo app for iOS.

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If you can't make it for logistical reasons, but finances allow please consider gifting a ticket.

Proudly sponsored by:

Alan C. Francis

In 20 years, Alan’s done a lot of different things in Software. He’s built control systems for dams in FORTRAN, the original DVD authoring tools on Windows in C++, Financial Systems on Solaris in Java, System Monitoring software on Linux in Ruby, and these days merchant tools for iOS in Objective C. In between he’s been an Agile process consultant for ObjectMentor and ThoughtWorks, and co-organises the Scottish Ruby Conference.

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Paul Wilson

Paul is a coach and coder with over ten years of experience of Agile/XP. He is an active member of the Ruby and Agile communities, and co-organiser of the Scottish Ruby Conference. He has spoken at many conferences and events; these include RubyConf, The Naked Agilist, and guest lectures at Glasgow Caledonian and Edinburgh Napier Universities.

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